Chrysler Imperial "80"

Make & Model Family

In 1926, Walter P. Chrysler decided to compete with North American marques Cadillac, Lincoln, Packard, and Duesenberg in the luxury car field. Chrysler offered a variety of body styles: a two/four-passenger roadster (four passenger if car had the rumble seat), a four-seat coupé, five-passenger sedan and phaeton, and a seven-passenger top-of-the-line limousine. The limo had a glass partition between the front and rear passenger compartments.

The Imperial's new engine was slightly larger than the company's standard straight 6. It was a 290 cubic inch six-cylinder with seven bearing blocks and pressure lubrication of 92 HP. Springs were semi-elliptic in the front. The car set a transcontinental speed record in the year it was introduced, driving more than 6,500 miles in the week. The car was chosen as the pace car for the 1926 Indianapolis 500. The model was designated E-80, the 80 being after the "guaranteed" 80 M.P.H. all-day cruising speed. Acceleration was also brisk breaking 20 seconds to 60 M.P.H.. Four-speed transmission was added in 1930.

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In 1926, Walter P. Chrysler decided to compete with North American marques Cadillac, Lincoln, Packard, and Duesenberg in the luxury car field. Chrysler offered a variety of body styles: a two/four-passenger roadster (four passenger if car had the rumble seat), a four-seat coupé, five-passenger sedan and phaeton, and a seven-passenger top-of-the-line limousine. The limo had a glass partition between the front and rear passenger compartments.

The Imperial's new engine was slightly larger than the company's standard straight 6. It was a 290 cubic inch six-cylinder with seven bearing blocks and pressure lubrication of 92 HP. Springs were semi-elliptic in the front. The car set a transcontinental speed record in the year it was introduced, driving more than 6,500 miles in the week. The car was chosen as the pace car for the 1926 Indianapolis 500. The model was designated E-80, the 80 being after the "guaranteed" 80 M.P.H. all-day cruising speed. Acceleration was also brisk breaking 20 seconds to 60 M.P.H.. Four-speed transmission was added in 1930.

When the second generation Chrysler Imperial was introduced in 1931, the first generation was given minor updates and was called the Chrysler Six.

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