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2020-05-20

Abingdon Classics

Brand

Abingdon Classics was begun by Max Kernick in 1975 with a London address. In 1978 he was joined by John Roff and the business extended to produce models of other makes (K&R Replicas). The partnership was dissolved at the end of July 1979 and the business reverted to Max’s ownership, at which time the JEM range of MG kits appeared (Magic Octagon series). Many of the patterns were made by Ian Pickering, with some of the patterns made by Richard Stokes and Brian Lawrence. John Simons (Marsh Models) painted and assembled some models to help with demand.

All models are white metal, sold built-up, and all are replicas of MGs (which were made in Abingdon, England until plant closure in 1980). Per the 1980 catalog, the goal was to produce a model of every MG ever made, and production model MGs were issued in authentic MG factory colors. There were 5 series, which form the prefix of the model numbers as follows:

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Abingdon Classics was begun by Max Kernick in 1975 with a London address. In 1978 he was joined by John Roff and the business extended to produce models of other makes (K&R Replicas). The partnership was dissolved at the end of July 1979 and the business reverted to Max’s ownership, at which time the JEM range of MG kits appeared (Magic Octagon series). Many of the patterns were made by Ian Pickering, with some of the patterns made by Richard Stokes and Brian Lawrence. John Simons (Marsh Models) painted and assembled some models to help with demand.

All models are white metal, sold built-up, and all are replicas of MGs (which were made in Abingdon, England until plant closure in 1980). Per the 1980 catalog, the goal was to produce a model of every MG ever made, and production model MGs were issued in authentic MG factory colors. There were 5 series, which form the prefix of the model numbers as follows:

Series One – Standard production MG sports and saloons.

Series Two – Competition MGs (both track racing and record-breaking).

Series Three – Special-bodied MGs (non-standard production models, one-offs, etc.)

Series Four – Special vehicles related to MGs, including promotional vehicles for clubs, etc.

Series Five – Concept cars which never reached production (proposed but none were made).

In addition, built versions of the J&M kits appeared in Abingdon Classics packaging with a ‘JM’ number prefix. Approximately 125 (of a planned 250) built versions of the Motorkits MG M-Type were also released with Abingdon Classics boxes. These can be distinguished from the standard kit by the erected top fitted to the model. In the early 1980’s most of the range was sold to Richard Briggs of MiniMarque43.

The above information was confirmed by Max Kernick on February 26, 2020. He also stated that some of the masters were reacquired from MiniMarque43 following the death of Richard Briggs. Reissued and new MG white metal models now appear under the Autotorque brand. Other brands Max Kernick has been responsible for include Top Marques, FM Autominis, Manoir Miniatures, and Max's Models.

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