Chrysler-Fevre Argentina S.A.

Brand

Before the 1940s, Argentina imported all of its vehicles. Any model or make could be purchased, and many Dodge, Plymouth, Desoto, Fargo, and Chrysler products were imported directly from the U.S.

1935 Dodges were used as taxis for many years, all black, with jump seats and an Imperial division between passenger and driver; they were all right-hand drive (Argentina switched to left hand drive in 1945, but taxis were allowed to run with right hand drive for many years afterwards).

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Before the 1940s, Argentina imported all of its vehicles. Any model or make could be purchased, and many Dodge, Plymouth, Desoto, Fargo, and Chrysler products were imported directly from the U.S.

1935 Dodges were used as taxis for many years, all black, with jump seats and an Imperial division between passenger and driver; they were all right-hand drive (Argentina switched to left hand drive in 1945, but taxis were allowed to run with right hand drive for many years afterwards).

After World War II, because car building stopped in the U.S. from 1942 to 1946, Argentina shifted towards European cars (e.g. Fiat, Renault) and then stopped importing altogether (except for diplomats and special situations). Car building was stressed after 1955 and by 1962 it is said that 22 automakers set up shop there through local investors or through direct involvement (Ford and Kaiser). Chrysler was associated with Fevre & Basset, and by 1962 was building the Valiant I (the 1960 version of the U.S. Plymouth Valiant.) Only the 4 door version was produced.

Chrysler-Fevre Argentina S.A. was sold to Volkswagen in 1980.

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