Hummel

Brand

 

In the early 1930s, the art of Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel started appearing on postcards throughout Germany and Switzerland. These images of children in pastoral settings caught the eye of Franz Goebel, director of the porcelain company W. Goebel Porzellanfabrik (now known as Goebel). In 1935, he negotiated a collaboration with Sister Hummel and started crafting figurines based on her drawings. Goebel debuted his new figurines at the Leipzig Trade Fair and the collectibles started to become popular. But, his success was cut short by Nazi control in Europe.

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In the early 1930s, the art of Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel started appearing on postcards throughout Germany and Switzerland. These images of children in pastoral settings caught the eye of Franz Goebel, director of the porcelain company W. Goebel Porzellanfabrik (now known as Goebel). In 1935, he negotiated a collaboration with Sister Hummel and started crafting figurines based on her drawings. Goebel debuted his new figurines at the Leipzig Trade Fair and the collectibles started to become popular. But, his success was cut short by Nazi control in Europe.

After the war, Goebel started producing Hummel figurines again (they are also known as M.I. Hummel figurines or simply Hummels). The figurines became especially popular with American troops stationed in West Germany, who sent Hummels to family members back in the United States. These rosy-cheeked figurines have been timeless collectibles ever since.

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